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Yes, our team are taking a well-deserved break during the festive season and therefore last online order before Christmas will be:⁣
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Tuesday 10th December midday for QLD ⁣
Wednesday 18th December midday for NSW & VIC.⁣
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Our last delivery before Christmas is December 24th and our first delivery in 2020 will be Saturday 11th January. ⁣
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You can continue to order at any time during the festive season and we look forward to your continued support in 2020.⁣
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Tis the season to be jolly..... 🎅🏼 🌲🔔🎁
It’s December the 7th, and we’re just going to come out and say it: We’re all starting to feel the familiar Christmas stress here at We Feed You HQ 🎄😣. It’s the shopping lists, the crazy social schedule, the school commitments and events, the entertaining and Christmas day menu decisions, the Mariah Carey onslaught 🙉, the ridiculous traffic, and underpinning it all, a slightly guilty feeling when we’re not embracing the festive spirit 😐. Are you picking up what we’re putting down here?⁣
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✨In the coming weeks we’re talking simple stress busters in the lead up to the silly season, and the first one we’re talking about is exercise. Think you’re too stressed out and busy to fit in your usual exercise? You might want to keep reading 🤓:⁣
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Exercise is your friend when stressful times hit, and here’s why ☝🏼:⁣
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💪🏼 Moving your body and getting your heart rate up gets more blood circulating around your body -  which helps us use up the excess blood glucose from that 4pm shortbread hit, and delivers more oxygen to our brain and other tissues. Exercise also helps lymph fluids circulate through the body, which removes toxins and other harmful materials. ⁣
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✨Exercise is a mood booster, because it actually reduces levels of the body's stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. At the same time, it stimulates the production of endorphins in our brain – the natural painkillers and mood elevators we all produce.⁣
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🙇🏻 Moving and stretching your body also helps reduce tension and soreness (like the ache in your shoulders or neck). It forces us to change our posture and use different muscle groups to those we over-work when we’re hunching over computers, steering wheels, and craning our necks looking at our phones.  ⁣
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😀 And last but not least - exercise helps you get out of your head and into your physical environment. Going for a walk, a run, a ride or a swim gets you outside where you’ll hear birds, smell flowers, see other people, and may forget for a moment the list of chores and commitments weighing you down. Getting out and moving your body helps you reconnect with the world around you, and keep things in perspective.⁣
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Ever wondered what makes you fart 🤔? Of course you have 😝! And do you know, Rosemary Stanton – one of our most favourite, super smart, no nonsense nutritionists even wrote a book about it!  ⁣
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💨 Gas is an essential and unavoidable part of digesting food – so if you’re not passing wind, there’s something wrong. Some gas comes from swallowed air, but most of it is actually produced in our gut, when various carbohydrates and fibre are fermented by the bugs making up our gut microbiome. These bugs live mostly in our large intestine (colon), and make up around 3kg of our total body weight 😮. The more we feed them with fibre rich plant foods, the more plentiful and diverse the population becomes 🐛🌱❤.⁣
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💨 Farts are mostly made up of odourless gases like carbon dioxide, hydrogen, methane and nitrogen, as well as sulphur dioxide (which is actually the stinky one 🙊). The average person produces between 400-2400mL of gas each day – which is a pretty wide range. Just FYI, a half blown up party balloon is about 1500mL 🎈.⁣
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💨 So which foods are the big culprits 🤔? Well that depends on whether you’re talking about odour or volume 😛! The smell of wind is more related to intense flavours in foods (think rich food and highly spiced dishes) or foods that release sulphur compounds (like eggs and cruciferous veggies). The big wind producers include the garlic and onion family, cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower or Brussels sprouts, the entire legume family, many grains and cereals (the more whole grain the windier), and certain fruits like pears and stone fruit. Chewing gum is another food to watch, in the windy stakes ☝🏼.⁣
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💨 Because our digestive systems differ, the windiness rating for various foods will change from person to person. If you’re lactose intolerant – milk will certainly do it! If you’re a fructose malabsorber, mango and watermelon might be culprits. And it also depends on the types of bacteria that make up your individual microbiome 🔬🐛 – some strains will be big wind producers 💨💨💨, and others not so much.⁣
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🤓 And there you have it. A quick run-down on the business of farting / tooting / parping. If you want to know more, we thoroughly recommend sourcing a copy of ‘Wind Breaks’ by Rosemary Stanton and Terry Bolin.⁣
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Okay, we really can’t deny it any longer 🙀. Christmas is coming, and it’s time to start getting organised. We think foodie gifts really are the best type 🍎🍪🍒 (it could be we’re biased here). Because how lovely is it to receive something handmade? Something you’ll actually use? Something you can cook with or serve with? Without further ado, here it is: our first instalment of food Christmas gift ideas 👉🏼.⁣
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🎄 Home made decorated Christmas cookies – an afternoon well spent, and super affordable⁣
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🎄 Homemade jams, relishes, sauerkraut or kimchi⁣
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🎄 Spice mixes in beautiful jars – bought or homemade, these look lovely and are super useful⁣
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🎄 Reusable beeswax wraps, silicone food covers, beautiful lunch boxes⁣
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🎄 Spunky serving ware like bento boxes or hand made ceramics⁣
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🎄 A beautiful cutting board or cheese board⁣
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🎄 A voucher to a cooking class or foodie tour (eg. Free to Feed)⁣
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🎄 Funky linen tea towels (we’ve been known to frame the super special ones)⁣
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🎄 Truffle salt and truffle infused oil – because who doesn’t love truffles!⁣
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🎄 A hand picked mini or maxi food hamper containing the ideas above⁣
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Feeling foodie? Save this post for next time you’re wandering around a market or shopping centre in search of gifts 🤔😍.⁣
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It’s summer, and to us, that means one thing: figs are back in season! *happy dance* 😍. These beauties are native to the Middle East and Mediterranean, and in fact are one of the world’s oldest fruits. If you’re not acquainted, ripe figs have very soft, sweet flesh and small crunchy (entirely edible) seeds 😋. They’re a great source of soluble fibre, and as you can imagine, are rich sources of antioxidants, soluble fibre and a stack of vitamins and minerals. It’s worth making a nutritional note that 100g (two medium figs) contains 3g fibre – so along with all those antioxidants, figs pack quite a punch in the gut health stakes 🙌🏼.  ⁣
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☝🏼 Fresh figs are pretty delicate, and best consumed within a few days of purchase. Here’s a few of our favourite ideas on how to make the most of them:⁣
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✨ Roast fresh figs with a drizzle of honey, a decadent treat with creamy Greek yoghurt⁣
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✨ Slice them up and cook them in your breakfast oats, for a lovely jammy sweetness⁣
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✨ If you’re lucky enough to have access to plenty, make yourself a batch of fig jam, to be served with a cheese platter, on toast, or swirled through muffin or cake mixes⁣
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✨ Poach slightly under-ripe figs in spiced syrup and serve as a hot or cold fruit compote⁣
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✨ Figs are just beautiful grilled and added to salads with fresh cheeses (eg. ricotta, bocconcini) and prosciutto⁣
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YUM! 😋 Share your favourite way to use figs below 👉🏼
Potatoes just make everything better, right? 🥔⁣
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Have you tried our meals containing this superstar vegetable?⁣
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Order now for delivery this week!⁣
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QLD & Northern NSW - Order before Tuesday afternoon!⁣
VIC, NSW & ACT - Order before Wednesday afternoon!⁣
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Are you on a low FODMAP diet and find it hard to know how much you can eat of each ingredient (without having to run to the toilet), while balancing a functioning life? 😧⁣
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Some veggies you can only have the heads, not the stalks. Some produce you can only have a limited amount, without starting to feel the bloating and all the other lovely symptoms! 💨 ⁣
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This might all feel a little overwhelming, as it takes quite some research to adjust and accommodate to this diet. ⁣
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Luckily we are here to help with our 17+ low FODMAP meals that are gluten free and only require heating! No planning, no researching - just nutritionally balanced meals that will leave you and your gut feeling your best! 🧘🏼‍♀️⁣
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In case you didn't realise, it's December today! How crazy is that? You're probably juggling getting your work complete for the year, buying all the presents and generally staying sane! 🤯⁣
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You won't see us posting tips & tricks on how to stay ''healthy'' during the holidays. Instead, we encourage you to be kind to yourself and enjoy this season with good food, your family and friends. ❤️🌲⁣
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Food is an enjoyment and a pleasure to be shared. ⁣
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The healthiest thing you can do is to take a deep breath and eat all the Christmas chocolate you've been waiting on the whole year! 🍫❣️⁣
Hoolie doolie! 😝 We’re pretty pumped about our recent menu edition: Japanese Fish Broth with Sweet Potato Noodles and Roasted Sesame Broccoli. Why? Because we love fish dishes that are both easy and tasty 🐟😋. And because we’re proud of our beautiful produce and the nutrition quality we’re serving up.  ⁣
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💙 We love that the first four ingredients in this dish are: blue grenadier, sweet potato, edamame and broccoli. Simple, nutrient dense and super tasty in a generous 375g serve 🍽.  And because we know you were wondering – it’s just one of our gluten and dairy free, low FODMAP options. That’s ticking a lot of boxes!⁣
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If there’s any fruit that deserves its own month, surely it’s Pomegranate ❤️, full of ruby coloured jewel-like seeds and tangy sweetness ❤. What’s not to love? Obviously we’re not the only ones who think so, because November is officially Pomegranate Month!⁣
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Pomegranate is a fruit native from Iran to North India, and has been cultivated throughout the Mediterranean since ancient times. In Australia, we grow them in tropical areas of Queensland, NSW and WA. The Australian season actually runs from November right through until March, so we’re a bit excited about the next four months of pomegranates aplenty 😮😍.⁣
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👉🏼When choosing pomegranates, have a chat to your greengrocer – aim for heavy pomegranates with dark red skin for the juiciest and sweetest varieties.  ⁣
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👉🏼The next step is actually extracting those beautiful seeds 😍. Be warned: pomegranate isn’t exactly a fast food. You’re likely to find yourself with stained hands and splattered clothing, in your quest to ply the seeds from the bitter white pith. Our trick here: roll your pomegranate around, pressing firmly before you cut it in half, then turn it upside down and give it a good old belting with the back of a spoon 😜.⁣
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Are pomegranates fiddly? Well yes 😅. But are they worth it? Also yes 🤗! And they’re really good for you – packed with antioxidants that have been shown to have powerful anti-inflammatory effects in scientific studies, and rich in fibre and micronutrients like vitamins C, E, K, folate and potassium ✨🤓.  ⁣
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👌Pomegranate seeds add a beautiful crunch 💥, sweetness and tang to salads or to garnish roast vegetables dishes. They’re also wonderful in desserts like parfaits and chia puddings, or fruit salads. We can’t go past fresh pomegranate simply served with Greek yoghurt for a simple and nutritious snack or dessert 🙌🏼😋. Our tip: if you’re drinking pomegranate juice for the health benefits, go for a 100% pomegranate, ‘no added sugar’ variety, to ensure you’re getting the good stuff.⁣
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Bone broth: If you believed what the internet tells you, it’ll cure anything from the common cold to cancer 🤔. You can make your own or buy it just about anywhere these days (at a tidy price 😨), but is it really the magical elixir we’re lead to believe? We thought it was time for a bit of WFY myth-busting 💥.⁣
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👉🏼 Firstly, we just want to clarify what bone broth actually is 🤓. Quite simply, it’s the flavoured water made from boiling the bones and connective tissue of animals 🍲. But what’s the difference between good old fashioned stock and ‘healing’ bone broth anyway? The answer is that while stock may use similar ingredients, the cooking time is much shorter (around 45 minutes). Bone broth is simmered for longer (up to 24 hours) to encourage bone breakdown and gelatin release into the water. The nutrient content of the final product will vary greatly, depending on cooking time and ingredients used.  ⁣
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👉🏼 Bone broth is commonly touted as a good source of protein, but such claims don’t always stack up. According to nutrition analysis of commercial bone broths, you can expect anywhere from 3 – 13g protein per cup, depending on the batch 🤓. Bone broth will also contain electrolytes such as sodium (bones naturally contain sodium), potassium and magnesium, so it’s a great fluid for rehydration when you’ve had a bout of dreaded gastro or food poisoning 😷.  ⁣
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👉🏼 One of the main health claims made about bone broth is that it’s high in collagen – a major protein that makes up around 75% of our connective tissue in joints, muscles, ligaments and our skin. Sounds great right? But here’s the clincher ✋🏼: before being absorbed, collagen (whether from bone broth or expensive collagen supplements) needs to be broken down to its constituent amino acids 😮. That’s right - our bodies can’t absorb collagen through the digestive system, but they can (and do) manufacture it using amino acids found in everyday protein rich foods ✔️.⁣
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👉🏼 Finally, are there any scientific studies to support the use of bone broth in healing and inflammation? The answer here is quite simply – no 🕵🏻. Our final thoughts on the subject?  Bone broth can be soothing and hydrating, and it does provide some nutritional value, but it doesn’t live up to its reputation as a magic elixir for your skin, hair, gut or immune system. Myth. Busted 🤓.⁣
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Life's too short for bad food! 🙅🏼‍♀️⁣
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Order our dietitian designed & chef prepared meals for delivery this week! 🙌🏼⁣
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QLD & Northern NSW - Order before Tuesday afternoon!⁣
VIC, NSW & ACT - Order before Wednesday afternoon!⁣
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Speaking of health halos 😇, coconut milk is our last milk option up for comparison, and certainly one that seems to be having it’s time in the sun ☀🍶.  ⁣
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☝🏼Despite its name, coconut is not actually a nut, so it is safe for many with nut allergies. Firstly, typical coconut milks for drinking are very different from the stuff you’ll get in a can and use for your curries or desserts. ‘Coconut beverage’ drinks are based on coconut cream, but diluted with water to make them less thick and rich (never-the-less, a decent source of fat at around 5g/cup 😯). The predominant fat in coconut milk is the saturated variety, and controversy rages between the scientific and alternative health communities as to whether this fat (thought to act more like medium chain triglycerides than other saturated fats) is healthy, harmful or somewhere in between! 😕⁣
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☝🏼Putting fat controversies aside, we can also tell you that coconut milk contains virtually no protein, calcium or vitamin D unless it’s been fortified, and can have an eye-raising ingredient list when it comes to sugars and other fillers. Once again, it’s a good idea to look closely at labels 🕵🏻 to understand what you’re buying, compare brands using the nutrient panel ‘per 100mL’ column, and favour calcium-fortified varieties. And in the case of coconut milk, you may want to keep an eye on your cholesterol count 📈.⁣
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🤔How does rice milk stack up nutritionally? We’re glad you asked!⁣
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☝🏼This grain-based milk option is made from milled rice and water, and like most ‘non-traditional’ milks, it will usually contain a number of additives to improve both the texture and flavour, making it a relatively highly processed product.  ⁣
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🤓You may or may not be surprised to learn that rice milk really isn’t a great source of nutrition, unless it’s been fortified. Rice milk is predominantly carbohydrate, is very low in fat, but also contains virtually no protein or valuable bone-building micronutrients like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium or vitamin D. Because of its poor nutrition profile, nutrition authorities advise against using rice milk as the main milk for infants, children and nutritionally compromised or underweight individuals, unless under the advice of a trained health professional.  ⁣
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☝🏼The wrap: If you enjoy the flavour of rice milk, make sure you’re drinking a brand that is fortified with protein and calcium. Try to include plenty of calcium and protein rich foods like green leafies, nuts, seeds - and if you eat fish 🐟 - bony varieties are very nutritious. ⁣
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🍶 🤔And what about almond milk then? Another popular plant-based option, almond milk sounds like a healthy and nutritious alternative to dairy  – because we all know how great almonds are, right? Well, we’re sorry to be party-poopers, but this is another milk alternative that doesn’t live up to its ‘health halo’ 😇. Why? Simply because almond milk does not contain a whole lot in the way of almonds!  ⁣
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☝🏼Check out the ingredient label of a few popular almond milk brands and you’ll find that most are between 95-98% water, with even the most ‘wholesome’ and ‘natural’ options offering only 5-7% almonds 😮. The result is a product that is low in protein, fat and kilojoules, but also a poor source of calcium and other micronutrients, unless it’s been fortified. In fact, to get the calcium content of one glass of regular milk, you’d need to eat about 100g of actual almonds! 🙊⁣
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🤔Our thoughts on almond milk? For those who can’t drink other milks, it can be a convenient coffee option at your local café or in your smoothie. But it’s not a great dairy alternative in terms of bone health or nutrition, and can contain a decent whack of added sugar, depending on the brand. If you’re an almond milk convert, we recommend putting your reading glasses on and checking your labels closely 🕵🏻!⁣ Stick to eating whole Australian almonds as a snack! 
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Next up in our milk comparison series is soy milk: ⁣
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🍶Traditional soy milk is made by soaking and grinding soybeans, boiling and then filtering the mixture. It’s plant based, and like cow’s milk, is a good source of high biological value protein (in this case around 6-7g/250mL cup) 💪🏼. Like most milks these days, soy comes in a variety of fat contents, and depending on the brand, also contains ingredients like emulsifiers, stabilisers, flavours and sweeteners to improve texture and increase palatability (so it’s a good idea to check out the ingredients and nutrition panel if this is your milk of choice).  ⁣
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☝🏼A bonus of soy milk – it comes with natural plant phytonutrients that can be beneficial for bone and heart health. If you’ve heard negative press about soy and health, you may like to know that systemic nutrition reviews have concluded there is no cause for alarm or avoidance of soy foods in the diet – even for those with hormone responsive breast cancer.  Once again, don’t believe everything you hear on the internet, when it comes to soy and health.⁣
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☝🏼On the calcium front, it’s important to know that soybeans are NOT naturally a good source. 🕵🏻 Look for a product that’s been fortified with calcium, to provide similar amounts to dairy (at least 100mg calcium per 100mL - this will be evident on the nutrition panel).  Despite it being naturally lactose free, some people can be allergic or intolerant to soy protein or the natural sugars in soy beans, meaning that this milk is not necessarily going to suit everyone.⁣
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Still haven’t found your milk of choice? Stay tuned for the wrap on more milk alternatives over the coming days 🤔🍶.⁣
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